About the Bedlington Terrier

Rollicking, charming, and full of fun.

INTEGRITY

We strive to breed healthy and happy purebred Bedlington Terriers for home, show & sport. All of our puppies are registered with the Canadian Kennel Club, and chosen for health and temperament first.

DID YOU KNOW?

Bedlingtons are lithe, energetic Englishmen. The crisp, curly coat; arched back; tasseled ears; scimitar-shaped tail; and fleecy, pear-shaped head are identifying features of this one-of-a-kind breed. As the curvy contours indicate, there’s sighthound—Whippet, most likely—in their family tree. Bedlingtons move with a light, springy step and when roused to pursuit can run like the wind.

LOYAL COMPANION

Rollicking, charming, and full of fun, Bedlingtons want most to be their family’s center of attention and are known to be protective of loved ones. For an active family looking for a no-shedding, lively, and loyal companion, the search might end here.

CARE

The Bedlington Terrier should do well on a high-quality dog food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval. Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior). Some dogs are prone to getting overweight, so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

GROOMING

The crisp, curly coat of the Bedlington Terrier is a mix of soft and harsh, but not wiry, hair. While fastidious owners will be happy to learn that it virtually does not shed at all, it grows very quickly and needs to be clipped every two months. Many owners learn the process, which involves both electric clippers and scissors, while others are happy to take their Bedlington to a groomer. In addition, a Bedlington needs to be brushed and/or combed once or twice a week. As with all breeds, the Bedlington’s nails should be trimmed regularly, because overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running.

EXERCISE

Bedlingtons, like most Terriers, have a fair amount of energy and require regular exercise to stay fit and happy. The breed is energetic, but not rambunctious or mischievous. A Bedlington loves to play fetch or go on a long walk or run, but afterwards he’s happy to just curl up on the couch with his family. Despite their lamb-like looks, Bedlingtons were bred to chase small animals, and that’s what they do. So they require a fenced-in yard and should be on a leash for all walks. Many Bedlingtons enjoy participating in agility, obedience, tracking, and earthdog competitions.

TRAINING

Early socialization and puppy training are recommended for all dogs. Though Bedlingtons can be stubborn, they are also both intelligent and eager to please. Bedlingtons do not respond to harsh training methods or physical correction, which can lead to a battle of wills rather than to obedience. Positive-reinforcement techniques, such as using praise and food as rewards, are much more successful.

HEALTH

Official Standard of the Bedlington Terrier

General Appearance: A graceful, lithe, well-balanced dog with no sign of coarseness, weakness or shelliness. In repose the expression is mild and gentle, not shy or nervous. Aroused, the dog is particularly alert and full of immense energy and courage. Noteworthy for endurance, Bedlingtons also gallop at great speed, as their body outline clearly shows.

Head: Narrow, but deep and rounded. Shorter in skull and longer in jaw. Covered with a profuse topknot which is lighter than the color of the body, highest at the crown, and tapering gradually to just back of the nose. There must be no stop and the unbroken line from crown to nose end reveals a slender head without cheekiness or snipiness. Lips are black in the blue and blue and tans and brown in all other solid and bi-colors.

Eyes - Almond-shaped, small, bright and well sunk with no tendency to tear or water. Set is oblique and fairly high on the head. Blues have dark eyes; blues and tans, less dark with amber lights; sandies, sandies and tans, light hazel; livers, livers and tans, slightly darker. Eye rims are black in the blue and blue and tans, and brown in all other solid and bi-colors.

 Ears - Triangular with rounded tips. Set on low and hanging flat to the cheek in front with a slight projection at the base. Point of greatest width approximately 3 inches. Ear tips reach the corners of the mouth. Thin and velvety in texture, covered with fine hair forming a small silky tassel at the tip. Nose - Nostrils large and well defined. Blues and blues and tans have black noses. Livers, livers and tans, sandies, sandies and tans have brown noses. Jaws - Long and tapering. Strong muzzle well filled up with bone beneath the eye. Close-fitting lips, no flews.

 Teeth - Large, strong and white. Level or scissors bite. Lower canines clasp the outer surface of the upper gum just in front of the upper canines. Upper premolars and molars lie outside those of the lower jaw.

Neck and Shoulders: Long, tapering neck with no throatiness, deep at the base and rising well up from the shoulders which are flat and sloping with no excessive musculature. The head is carried high.

Body: Muscular and markedly flexible. Chest deep. Flat-ribbed and deep through the brisket, which reaches to the elbows. Back has a good natural arch over the loin, creating a definite tuck-up of the underline. Body slightly greater in length than height. Well-muscled quarters are also fine and graceful.

Legs and Feet: Lithe and muscular. The hind legs are longer than the forelegs, which are straight and wider apart at the chest than at the feet. Slight bend to pasterns which are long and sloping without weakness. Stifles well angulated. Hocks strong and well let down, turning neither in nor out. Long hare feet with thick, well-closed-up, smooth pads. Dewclaws should be removed.

Coat: A very distinctive mixture of hard and soft hair standing well out from the skin. Crisp to the touch but not wiry, having a tendency to curl, especially on the head and face. When in show trim must not exceed 1 inch on body; hair on legs is slightly longer.

Tail: Set low, scimitar-shaped, thick at the root and tapering to a point which reaches the hock. Not carried over the back or tight to the underbody.

Color: Blue, sandy, liver, blue and tan, sandy and tan, liver and tan. In bi-colors the tan markings are found on the legs, chest, under the tail, inside the hindquarters and over each eye. The topknots of all adults should be lighter than the body color. Patches of darker hair from an injury are not objectionable, as these are only temporary. Darker body pigmentation of all colors is to be encouraged.

Height: The preferred Bedlington Terrier dog measures 16½ inches at the withers, the bitch 15½ inches. Under 16 inches or over 17½ inches for dogs and under 15 inches or over 16½ inches for bitches are serious faults. Only where comparative superiority of a specimen outside these ranges clearly justifies it, should greater latitude be taken.

Weight: To be proportionate to height within the range of 17 to 23 pounds.

Gait: Unique lightness of movement. Springy in the slower paces, not stilted or hackneyed. Must not cross, weave or paddle.